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Warriors Dont Cry Essays

Warriors Dont Cry

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Warriors Don’t Cry

Melba Pattillo Beals- A junior when she entered Central High School, Melba did a lot of growing up that year. With the Supreme Court overturning their decision, the same day of that decision, on her way home from school she was attacked and almost raped. She endured a lot of harassment that year. She got her heels stepped on between every class and was singed by the water when she tried to shower after gym class. She had all her clothes sprayed on by ink and she got her eyes sprayed with acid which caused her to have to wear glasses. That same year she lived through what was supposed to be the happiest time of a girls live. She got her first boyfriend and had her first date, but all she could ever think about was how she was going to make it through her next day. Although eventually she did happen to make a friend (Link) that helped her by telling her places to avoid, he could not be seen in public with her. That year Melba turned 16 and though that year she had nobody attend her party due to the fact that they were scared to come over to her house due to all the bomb threats everybody especially the Little Rock Nine were receiving. Everyday became a struggle for Melba, she woke-up, got dressed and went to school were she tried to make herself not seen to avoid the harassment, then she had to give interviews to reporters (which she had determined that that was her future job), and then went home to an endless ringing phone from threats or plain old hang ups. That year she had to due without a lot of the teenage things, once her friend Minnijean was expelled, she had no one to talk to, at home or at school. After that terrible year Melba spent at Central, she did not return there for her senior year. Instead, she went to stay at the home of Dr. George McCabe and his wife Carol in the Santa Rosa, California.

Dr. Lois Peyton Pattillo (Mother Lois)-Giving birth to a sick baby the same day that Pearl Harbor was bombed started the life of Melba Pattillo Beals. Mother Lois was one of the first African American to integrate the University of Arkansas where she received her master’s in education. She worked as a seventh grade English teacher and was the main source of income for her family.

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"Warriors Dont Cry." 123HelpMe.com. 10 Mar 2018
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Warriors Dont Cry Essay - Warriors Don’t Cry Melba Pattillo Beals- A junior when she entered Central High School, Melba did a lot of growing up that year. With the Supreme Court overturning their decision, the same day of that decision, on her way home from school she was attacked and almost raped. She endured a lot of harassment that year. She got her heels stepped on between every class and was singed by the water when she tried to shower after gym class. She had all her clothes sprayed on by ink and she got her eyes sprayed with acid which caused her to have to wear glasses....   [tags: essays research papers]1980 words
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Her husband worked at the Missouri Pacific Railroad as a hostler’s helper but they divorced when Melba was only 5. Besides Melba, she had two other people to support, Melba’s brother Conrad and her mother Grandma India. Although Grandma India earned some money cleaning white people’s houses, this was not a big part to the family’s income. With Melba’s decision to be one of the first to integrate Central High School, Mother Lois’s job was in jeopardy. When her contract came up for renewing, they told her that it would not be renewed unless Melba dropped out of Central High School. Help from the community Bishop, Mother Lois was finally offered her job back, after several weeks of no money and nowhere to turn for help. After the hardest year for that family, Mother Lois, unlike her daughter, stayed in Little Rock to raise her son Conrad.

India Anette Peyton (Grandma India)-She watched two people close to her be vulnerable to physical pain, just to help the future generations. She watched and supported Mother Lois integrate the University of Alabama and Melba integrate Central High School. She stayed at home and help support the family in their times of need. She always had a comment that would make everything seem not so important in the long run. She always kept the Lord’s name close at heart and let nobody forget it. She stayed up nights protecting the house and scaring away would be assailants. Although she never graduated from school, Grandma India helped Melba be a better student by reading to her and keeping her mind in the right track. Without her support and guidance to keep everybody sane, the year Melba spent in Central would have been the last for the family.


Warriors Don’t Cry:
     The era of the 1950’s was a time where African Americans were not allowed to use the same public facilities as whites. This book, Warrior’s Don’t Cry, takes place in this era. The doctrine of “separate but equal” facilities had just been overruled. Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka Kansas just set a new precedent that would integrate schools on May 17, 1954. In the book you go through the time period in which those nine students were sent into Central High School not knowing what to expect and barely coming out of there alive. Their first year (1957-1958) in Central High School was a time for growing for those nine students. The book deals with all the problems the US had with the citizens accepting the civil right laws that were changing and what they had to do to make things work out. At the end, they give you a 30 year look back upon what impacts that year had on those nine individuals that gave away their teenage years of happiness to help the country deal with that problem.

Summary:
      The book Warriors Don’t Cry written and experienced by Melba Pattillo Beals describes the story of the first nine African American students to attend the solely white Central High School. When the Supreme Court overturned their ruling on Plessy v. Ferguson, stating that “separate but equal” schools were not constitutional this started the process of integrating the schools. When nine students, Melba Pattillo Beals (junior), Minnijean Brown (junior), Carlotta Walls, Gloria Ray, Elizabeth Eckford, Jefferson Thomas, Terrence Roberts, Ernest Green (senior), and Thelma Mothershed were chosen (they also volunteered by signing up for this task) for their grades as well as their enrollment to their prior school, everything thing seemed in place.
With the arrival of the first day of school came, the nine of them had met previously to decide that it would be better if they came in as a group and not alone. That day governor Faubus had ordered the Arkansas’s National Guard to not allow the process of integration to continue. That morning Melba and her mother were not able to find their group, once they were denied entrance to the school by the National Guards, they were left facing an angry mob that was waiting to stop the “Negroes” from entering their school at any cost. This was only the first day they attempted to come in. When finally allowed to enter the school (only after President Eisenhower sent in the respected 101st Airborne division to protect and ensure that no life threatening injuries were sustained) the nine of them faced horrible treatment by their fellow students and by their teachers. None of them had any classes with each other and had to endure physical as well as emotional torture from everybody. All nine of them were physically abused; they were kicked, pushed down the stairs, punched and threatened with weapons. They also had to endure the harsh words that they were being called, and everyday they had to go home with their cloths ruined because they had been sprayed with ink. Although it was rare, they did have some people who were pleasant to them, but this rarity quickly faded when then they were the targets of abuse. White students and their parents had meetings to speak about and makes plans on how to get rid of them. When Minnijean was expelled from school, for having poured chili on one of her attackers, they saw this as a possible means of getting rid of all of them. The attacks got worst when the 101st guards were taken away and the Arkansas’s National Guards (they one first hired to not allow them in) where replaced and now they were responsible for their safety. The attacks came part of all, now eight, of their lives. This went on all year and got even worse with the prospect of one of them getting to wear the same robe as them at graduation. At the end, Ernie became the first African-American to receive a diploma from Central High School. After many legal troubles to get them back in for their senior year, Carlotta Walls and Jefferson Thomas became graduates from Central High School.

Perception:
     Although I already knew how bad African Americans were treated during the period of adjustment, I just was not aware of the disregard the authorities that were hired to protect those individuals in danger had towards them. I also was not aware that even after President Eisenhower sent in the 101st Airborne Soldiers that they still had problems with keeping the students in the school. I was glad to see that one person (Link) was there to help her survive through the year but I was surprise to hear that it was just one person. I had come to believe that others would have come to their aid.

Cloudy Points:
     Although the author did a very good job describing the pain and torture that she went through her year at Central, I was not clear upon her later years. She described that she was one of the first to room in a residence hall but she did not describe anything about it. She was also very vague on the NAACP’s role in the whole ordeal. She talked about their legal problems a little bit but I was not clear what finally happened to them.

Gaps:
     The one major gap that I felt should have been covered more was the role of the brother and the problems he went through as well. Living with one of the most famous people at that time most of had some affects upon him, and throughout the whole book, she only slightly mentioned him in little bits. Another thing I wished she had said something about was her senior year. I do not know if she went to an integrated school (being in California-I believe it would be) or an all white or an all black school.

Opinion:
     I think the book was very well written and since it was from her viewpoint, I believe that she accurately depicted it. The one flaw I found in the writing of the book was that by the middle of the book, the stories started to become redundant. Although you cannot change time to make different things happen, I wished she had talked about different aspects of the story not previously talked about. If I were to be asked to write the book, I would keep mostly everything the same but the time in the middle were she talks about the everyday abuse and explains what happened everyday, I would have taken different storied I had and replaced the ones that were familiar to the ones previously talked about. I would recommend this book to others if I knew that they were interested in this subject. Although the book was not one to keep your attention for very long, you would have been intrigued if you knew nothing about the problems they went through for the right that African Americans have today. I would recommend this book to people who are not aware of the things African Americans had to go through to get to where they are today. It would help that person understand things and help explain all the problems and the way the mind of people (blacks and whites) worked back then.


Beals, Melba Pattillo. Warriors Don’t Cry. First Washington Square Press trade paperback printing February 1994. Washington Square Press Publication of Pocket Books, a division of Simon& Schuster Inc. New York, NY.




Melba Pattillo Beals' Warriors Don't Cry

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Warriors Don't Cry begins when Melba and eight other black men and women in their forties return to their home state of Arkansas to meet the then-governor, Bill Clinton. Melba, the narrator and author, explains that the group, called the Little Rock Nine, is visiting Central High School in Little Rock. As teenagers in 1957, the nine of them were the first African-American students to be integrated into the school.

When Melba is twelve years old, the Supreme Court rules that separate schools for whites are illegal, a ruling called Brown v. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. In the year after the ruling, Melba sees very little change in segregation. She is still at an all-black high school, but she and sixteen other black students sign up to attend the white school.

Because of the threat of violence, the number of black students who will participate in the integration is decreased from seventeen to nine. Several times in the few days before school is supposed to start, lawsuits are filed that threaten to stop the nine students. Governor Faubus declares that he is going to send the Arkansas National Guard to the high school, though he does not say whether they are there to protect the nine or to stop them from entering the school. Grandma India begins to stay awake at night with a shotgun near her. Finally, a few days after school has started, federal court judge Ronald Davies orders that the students be allowed to attend.

On September 3, 1957, Melba and her mother drive to Central High School for Melba's first day of class. A huge white mob has gathered, and the Arkansas National Guard encircles the school. Luckily, both Melba and her mother make it to the car and escape unharmed. Melba is not allowed to leave her house or answer the door or the phone. She tells her grandmother that she wants to go back to Horace Mann, her old high school, but her grandmother insists that Melba is not a quitter.

President Eisenhower and Governor Faubus meet and attempt to resolve the problem of integration in Arkansas, but the meeting is unsuccessful, and on September 20, 1957, the State of Arkansas goes to federal court before Judge Davies. Judge Davies rules that the Arkansas National Guard must be removed and that the Little Rock Nine must be allowed into Central High School.

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Melba Pattillo Beals' Warriors Don't Cry." 123HelpMe.com. 10 Mar 2018
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=157468>.

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Melba Pattillo Beals' Warriors Don't Cry Essay - Warriors Don't Cry begins when Melba and eight other black men and women in their forties return to their home state of Arkansas to meet the then-governor, Bill Clinton. Melba, the narrator and author, explains that the group, called the Little Rock Nine, is visiting Central High School in Little Rock. As teenagers in 1957, the nine of them were the first African-American students to be integrated into the school. When Melba is twelve years old, the Supreme Court rules that separate schools for whites are illegal, a ruling called Brown v....   [tags: Melba Beals Warriors Cry]1399 words
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Governor Faubus removes the guard and predicts that blood will run in the streets of Little Rock if the schools are integrated.

On Monday, September 23, 1957, Melba and the other black students go to school. They are again greeted by a mob of angry white people. In the middle of one class, Melba is forced to flee to the principal's office, as the mob has broken the barricades and is headed for the school. Someone in the principal's office proposes that they give the crowd one of the children to kill so the others can escape. Gene Smith, the assistant chief of police, smuggles the nine students out of the school. The day after the mob attack, Melba stays home and reads that President Eisenhower has announced he will use force to prevent this kind of mob rule and to enforce federal law. The next day, the 101st Airborne Division (a division of war heroes) arrives in Little Rock.

Each black student has his or her own escort from the 101st Airborne Division. Melba's solider, Danny, protects her when someone attempts to throw acid in her eyes. In October, Melba, Ernie, and Minnijean meet with some of Central High's white students under the guidance of a Norwegian reporter, Mrs. Jorumn Rickets, who hopes to foster some sort of understanding between the two groups. The meeting is a failure. Eisenhower withdraws the 101st Airborne, and the nine students are forced to rely on the Arkansas National Guard for protection. The Nine continue to be terrorized: one day, white girls attack Melba in the showers and hold her under scalding water. At the same time, the newspaper that Mrs. Bates (the President of the NAACP in Little Rock) runs is being financially ruined by white businesspeople, and the State Attorney is threatening NAACP officials across the state.

On December 17th, white boys surround Minnijean in the school cafeteria. Minnijean throws hot chili on two of the boys. Minnijean is suspended. The segregationists start a new chant: “One nigger down and eight to go.” Minnijean is allowed to return to school, and a short while later, a white boy pours a bucket of soup on her head. Later, the boy who poured soup on Minnijean attacks her, and a fight ensues. Nobody knows exactly what happened, but the white students allege that Minnijean fought back. Minnijean is expelled from Central High School, and three white students are suspended. The NAACP arranges for a scholarship for Minnijean at a high school in New York.

One day, Melba is almost surrounded by a group of white boys led by Andy, her main tormentor. She is saved by a white boy named Link, who gives her the keys to his car. That night, Melba returns Link's car to him, and he begins to warn her of the plans that the segregationists have made for her. Melba and Link become friends. On April 16, Judge Davies is removed from the Little Rock integration lawsuits and replaced by an Arkansas judge named Harry Lemley.

One Saturday morning, Link and Melba visit Nana Healey, Link's black nanny. Link thinks that Nana Healey has tuberculosis. Melba finds a doctor in the black community to tend to her. Nana Healey is dying, and Melba has to tell Link. Meanwhile, the integration case is reopened, with Judge Lemley presiding, and the school board once again asks for a postponement of integration at Central High School. Melba's mother, Lois, is nearly fired from her teaching job of fourteen years because Melba won't withdraw from Central High School. The end of the school year is approaching, and the segregationists are desperate to keep Ernie, the oldest of the nine, from graduating. Yet, on May 27, Ernie graduates. The next day, Link calls in tears. Nana Healey has died. Link asks Melba to leave Little Rock with him. Melba agrees to go, knowing she will not follow through with her promise.

By May 29, the Nine (including Minnijean) have begun a tour of the northern states, where they are treated like heroes and celebrities. Meanwhile, the integration effort in Little Rock is disintegrating. Judge Lemley grants the school board's plea to delay integration for three years. The NAACP sets up a round of appeals, and by September of 1958, the students are gearing up for their second year at Central. Rather than allow that to happen, Governor Faubus shuts down all of Little Rock's high schools. While Melba is waiting to return to school, Grandma India is diagnosed with leukemia and dies in October of 1958. By September of 1959, the NAACP has decided that the strain on the families is too great. They ask people in NAACP chapters across the country to take in the students. Melba is sent to Santa Rosa, California, to the home of the McCabes, a white Quaker family. The McCabes nurture and care for Melba and convince her to go to college in January of 1960.

In September of 1960, Central is again open to integration, but only two of the nine students are readmitted. They eventually graduate. Melba begins to attend San Francisco State University with predominantly white students. One night in 1962, while she is at school, a white soldier named John comes to her room to meet her roommate. There is mutual attraction, and soon they are engaged to be married. Melba relates how she keeps in touch with Link during this time. But when Link hears that she is getting married, and to a white man, he is furious, as Melba had always maintained she could not date a white man. They never speak again. Six months later, Melba and John are married. They have a daughter named Kelli. Seven years after their daughter's birth, they split up because Melba wants to be a reporter and work, and John wants a housewife. Melba goes to journalism school at Columbia and becomes a reporter. She ends the book by saying that if her experience at Central High School has taught her anything, it is that we are all one.



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